Same as it ever was?

I wrote this on my Facebook wall one year ago today, in three successive status posts.

2014: Groundhog Day comes to social justice. It’s fifty years after Freedom Summer, but it all looks so similar. Feds needing to step in behind racist police and court actions.

Also: These unindicted deaths? These are not a bug in the system. They are a feature. Even worse, these aren’t introduced by the code, they’re part of the language and the hardware.

Social justice *now*. End neo-fascism *now*. End death penalty culture *now*. End the mindless worship of police and military power *now*. End victim blaming *now*.

The world is not changed by superheroes. It’s changed by ordinary people choosing to step outside the machines of injustice they’ve been assigned to.

I wrote “End entitlement culture *now*.” but I took it out, realizing it would be misread by some.

The worst entitlement culture is the one that says that prosperity is a mark of moral goodness, and poverty a sign of disfavor of God for moral weakness.

The worst entitlement culture is the one that says white boys are destined for prosperity and power, and their “youthful transgressions” just a thing to be grown out of, while black boys are destined for criminality, and their“youthful transgressions” a sign of things to come, to be addressed harshly as a curb to the inevitable.

The worst entitlement culture sees a young black man with a sword, a young black man with a BB gun, a black CHILD with a toy gun, and sees a threat to be gunned down…while cheering for open carry.

The worst entitlement culture sees black people treated badly and takes refuge in victim blaming—they must have *done* something to *deserve* that.

The worst entitlement culture says that the emotional discomfort of white people merits the death of black people.

The worst entitlement culture says that the emotional discomfort of black people…the expectations of servility and saintliness…are to be simply accepted and endured.

The worst entitlement culture looks on at hungry children and says, “well, you shouldn’t have had them, then” and “I earned my wealth.”

Wanting safety and warmth and health for one’s children, one’s elderly, one’s working poor? That’s not entitlement. That’s justice.